Design for Longevity

The process of designing for longevity in product systems is achieved by having optimum use, maintenance, repair and upgrades developed for a product. Increasing a products durability and value through the implementation of more hardwearing materials is also justifiable, when products have a longer life. If the user forms an emotional connection or attachment with the product this also increases the likelihood that it will be kept and maintained. Overall a designer can influence an objects longevity through a combination of good design practice and appealing to the users emotional and aesthetic values.

Contributor: Sarah Heimeier, 2013
VOLKSWAGEN CASE STUDY

Volkswagen (Germany) constructed a partnership through the service of mobility to an apartment building -‘Mietermobil’ and ‘Wonh mobil’. An array of cars are offered, maintained by the dealer, washed by local petrol stations and used by residents in the apartment building. This program means a reduction in environmental impact, reduction in land use for parking and a more efficient way to meet mobility needs. In doing this, the utilisation of design for longevity in products and their system means that the object is capable of being utilised better and the number of product lives is increased.

Contributor: Sarah Heimeier, 2013
MELBOURNE BIKE SHARE SYSTEM

The state Bike Share is a misused example as it still remains significantly unintegrated into the urban life and culture of Melbourne. The limited availability of helmets, a lack of connectedness with other forms of local public transport and a need for greater improvements to the bicycle road network all contribute to this. Because of these aspects the use life of the object remains well below it's capability.

Contributor: Sarah Heimeier, 2013