Graffiti Walls

Graffiti walls are a method of crowd sourcing opinions, suggestions & other data, in which a sheet of paper and a pen are fixed to a wall allowing the public to add their ideas. Typically one question will be asked, which can be very general, “What would you like to see at RMIT?” Or more specific, “do you prefer the blue or cream paint samples?” Graffiti walls are best suited to projects where it is difficult to speak to, or observe people, for ethical, cultural or convenience reasons. It is very cheap and time effective, and has the potential to gain wide, in-depth responses.

Contributor: Alexander Brown, 2013
MIT CASE STUDY

A student at MIT studying human factors in relation to public toilets pioneered the Graffiti Wall method. Hanging them in public toilets he photographed the results each day. The method was very effective at gaining insight and feelings around a space that many people wouldn’t feel comfortable talking to a researcher about.

Contributor: Alexander Brown, 2013
TATTERSALL'S LANE CASE STUDY

It is worth noting infallibilities in ‘Graffiti Walls’ as a design method. The method was recently used in Tattersall’s Lane in Melbourne City to gauge feedback on an optical illusion. It attracted a lot of ‘witty’ responses, among which a few genuine answers were scattered. By the time the author saw the survey, the pen had been stolen.

Contributor: Alexander Brown, 2013