Scenario Building

The scenario building method refers to user-product interaction, in either natural, constructed or imagined contexts. It is used to evaluate how a system functions, as well as test theories, and also enables attributes or features to be designed. It allows for the opportunity to visualise or potentially “make real” a person’s experience, enhancing the quality of the interaction with the product or system. Scenarios also allow for flexibility and change, evoking reflection and multiple views for interaction and also allowing for categorisation, helping to recognise and revaluate generalisations. (Suri, J.F. and Marsh, M., 2000 and Carroll, J.M, 1999)

Contributor: Jessica Mew, 2013
SUSTAINABLE STREET 2030

This case study for Sustainable Street 2030 focuses on mobility, with six scenarios imagining the future of mobility. In one of these scenarios they show incentives for drivers in collective cars that advertise extra seats when headed to a destination. In small studies with the right kind of people this may work but on a large scale many people would not want to delay themselves by picking up other passengers or potentially putting themselves in dangerous situations. Scenarios are a good method of depicting how these systems may work but to gain a qualitative outcome the scenario and trial must be on a larger scale, with a broader user group (J├ęgou, F, et al., 2012).

Contributor: Jessica Mew, 2013
PHYSICS LAB

The aim of this project was for a group of teachers and system developers to create a virtual physics laboratory. Scenario building was used to collaboratively work on a series of scenarios that describe current and future classroom activities and opportunities. The scenarios were used to analyse and evaluate design trade-offs that were implicit in these scenarios. Codifying the advantages and disadvantages that were specific to achieving the requirements of the classroom. The scenarios ultimately provided more information, and more kinds of information that were then able to be utilised by evolving the set of scenarios to provide a quality scenario-based design (Carroll, J.M, et al., 1998).

Contributor: Jessica Mew, 2013